Work in Progress 6: Waiting

"Waiting"  first view.  The tracing lines are easily visible at this early stage.

“Waiting” first view. The tracing lines are easily visible at this early stage.

Waiting:  Second view. Undercolour now over the whole page (except for the hair ornaments).

Waiting: Second view.
Undercolour now over the whole page (except for the hair ornaments).

Waiting: third view. Building up the colour of the walls with several layers of different colours.

Waiting: third view. Building up the colour of the walls with several layers of different colours.

Waiting: fourth view.  The blacks have been added now (hair and obi).

Waiting: fourth view. The blacks have been added now (hair and obi).

Waiting: fifth view. Getting close to the finishing line.  Time to start on the hair ornaments.

Waiting: fifth view. Getting close to the finishing line. Time to start on the hair ornaments.

"Waiting" the finished drawing.

“Waiting” the finished drawing. 340 x 520 mm. 2013

I invite you to click onto any of these images to make them bigger.

I was thinking a lot about chromatic greys while I was working on this drawing.  What are chromatic greys?  They are grey-like tones but they are not really grey.  They have perceptible colour in them.  For instance, a good example of a chromatic grey is the wall directly behind Satohana.  You may think it is just grey but it is actually made up of greens, reds, blues and purples.  Layers of colour make this area much richer than if I had just used grey pencil per se.

Much of the drawing contains muted colours.  What are muted colours?  They fall between chromatic greys and prismatic colours.  (Prismatic colours represent hues at the highest level of saturation – what you would think of as bright yellows, blues, reds etc.  ie the colours seen in a prism.)  Muted colours are softer than prismatic colours but they still are definite colours…more ‘colourful’ than chromatic greys.  ie Satohana’s kimono is muted blue.

So then, what is the meaning of achromatic?  This word means “without colour”.  Black, white and all shades of grey without colour come into the achromatic category.  In this drawing, Satohana’s hair, the black on her obi and some of her canvas bag are clearly achromatic.

Recently when I was overseas I found a terrific book on colour.  It is called “Colour: A workshop for artists and designers’ by David Hornung.  Second edition.  Copyright 2005, 2012.  Laurence King Publishing Ltd.  ISBN: 978-1-85669-877-1.  One of my favourite things about it is its illustrated glossary at the back.  It so clearly explains and shows these colour terms and encourages one, when working with colour, to really think about what one is doing.  I recommend this book to everybody who works with colour.

When I am working with pencils, because I am building up layers of colour, I am constantly analysing what I am seeing in the photo source material.  I’m trying to figure out how to make each colour.  Since I bought this book a couple of months ago, I have found that it has helped my analysis and has, I think, made me better at seeing, even with my long years of experience behind me.

Who was Satohana waiting for?  The answer is in “Rare View” below.

"Rare View" - coloured pencil drawing.

“Rare View” – coloured pencil drawing.

Related posts:  Waiting and Rare View

Related Page:  Subject 2: Geisha

9 Responses to Work in Progress 6: Waiting

  1. Hi Julie. Thanks for the book recommendation. I have ordered it from Amazon and can’t wait to read it. I am fascinated by colour and the theory behind it.

  2. Pingback: Waiting | juliepodstolski

  3. Malcolm says:

    HI Julie One of the things I find difficult in responding to your new works is to convey my thoughts about it in an original way. I seem to keep saying the same thing over and over e.g. “wonderful” “incredible” “inspired” etc. etc. but I guess for as long as I keep having the same reactions I will continue to use the same words…..congratulations on “Waiting”.

    I have just started my second reading of Hornung’s book and I couldn’t agree more, its great. The only pity is that the exercises all require the use of either gouache or acrylic gouache paints which means more expenditure if you want to do them. Having ploughed my way through Itten and Albers books on colour Hornung was welcome relief (except for the need to buy paints to do the exercises, mind you the books is worth reading even if you don’t do them).

    best wishes

    Malcolm

    • Well, Malcolm, I have to admit that I haven’t done the exercises either (but I did similar exercises with paints back in the day). I’m so pleased that you like the Hornung book and also endorse it. Yeah – sorry about the paints. However I think one could achieve the desired outcomes with pencils. I mean, I achieve them in the drawings – so I think the same would apply with the set exercises. It sounds as though you have been a great deal more thorough in the reading of your colour theory books than I have!

  4. Malcolm says:

    ps. mind you all of the books are great ways to procrastinate (haven’t used a pencil yet)

    Malcolm

  5. Malcolm says:

    Hi Julie, For those thinking of buying Hornung’s book they might like to know that if you buy it through “The Book Depository” as I did, they don’t ever charge postage on their books, makes it even cheaper.

    Malcolm

  6. John McCarthy says:

    Love your work amazing.

    I’m hooked!

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