Tag Archives: blurry drawing

Daydream

“Daydream”  coloured pencils and oil pastels, 215 x 290 mm.  August 2017.

Daydream – a pleasant fantasy or reverie.

“Daydream” is my second drawing from a photograph I took in Pontocho, Kyoto in the spring of 2013.  The first drawing is “Promenade”, February 2016.

Promenade
190 x 250 mm, February 2016

I was persuaded to let Matthew (husband) keep “Promenade” as it is a favourite of his.  However I did so want to exhibit it in my exhibition Entranced next month.  A few days ago I had the bright idea to do another version of it, this time using Sennelier oil pastels as well as coloured pencils and drawing it larger than the first one.

I was curious to see how I would treat the subject 18 months after my first interpretation and after months in the interim doing impressionistic Paris drawings.

Here they are side by side; the new one on the right.  I didn’t look at the first drawing   while I drew the second so as not to be influenced by it.  The dark areas are more intense (saturated) in “Daydream” than “Promenade” and I think the new drawing has more luminosity and power than the older one.

In the new drawing, the figures have a floating quality and the road sweeps up rather than along, but the scene has a gentle dreaminess so I’m leaving it this way.

So Matt gets to keep “Promenade” while I get to exhibit “Daydream”.  This is called ‘having one’s cake and eating it too’!

“Daydream” is the 23rd and final drawing for Entranced opening on 7 September (until 20) at Kidogo Arthouse, Bathers Beach, Fremantle.

 

Promenade

"Promenade" A Pontocho impression 190 x 250 mm February 2016

“Promenade”
A Pontocho impression
190 x 250 mm
February 2016

Art made with coloured pencils does not have to be sharply defined, precise and detail-filled. Pencils can create their own version of impressionism; loose and soft with boundaries spilling over, merging and melting into one another.

As you, Honourable Viewer, are not given every single bit of information, you are free to fill in the gaps. You can make it your own story, perhaps become one of the people strolling.  While lack of specific detail makes the drawing impersonal on one level, it makes it more personal on another.  There is plenty of room for you to add, interpret and imagine.  You can actually put yourself into the picture.

The source photo for this drawing in its entirety. You can see what a small part of the photo I chose for my composition.

The source photo for this drawing in its entirety. You can see what a small part of the photo I chose for my composition.