Intrigue

“Intrigue”
35 x 25 cm. coloured pencils. May 2019

Within the web of Venice one wanders, and wonders, “Shall I turn right (or left)?  What is beyond that bridge?  I’ll go straight“, [side-tracked] “But oh – THAT way looks intriguing.  Which way, which way?”  And after a few more moments, glancing back, “Now, where the heck did I come from?” And so one twists and turns until one is deep within the labyrinth, hoping one has memorized the way back.

There are infinite pathways.  Each one offers another view point, another framed composition which must be stopped at and dreamily sighed over.  Accompanying the wondering wanderer is the sound of lapping water and (in spring) blackbird song amplified and bouncing off stone walls (those skew-whiff walls which frame compositions).

Of course it is early, for later on Calle del Caffettier (as indeed every other calle) will be choked with tourists.  But right now on this March Sunday morning I am almost alone.

Sigh!


Afterword: I had trouble getting back into drawing after my recent Italian trip.     As I walked in a fallow state of mind along my local beach it dawned on me that our West Australian shells contain the same colours as the marble and stone buildings of Venice.  (Well, after all, both shells and Venice are immersed in sea water periodically depending on moon, weather, season and tides.)  I carried a few shells home and somehow this collection of colourful calcium carbonate gave me the impetus to get back to work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8 thoughts on “Intrigue

  1. Robyn Varpins

    I love the link with the shells. we find inspiration all around us, when we least expect. Maybe it made those far away images more concrete and close by.

    Reply
    1. juliepodstolski Post author

      Hi Robyn, I think it was my love of colour which connected me to the shells. When I saw all those various shades of pink glowing in the sand, it enabled me to reflect on the pinks of Venice – and so I posted the “Pretty in Pink” blog a few weeks back. The shells were definitely a connection but on a deep level that I’m not even now sure of. Whatever it was, their presence gave me a sense of ‘rightness’.

      Reply
  2. anna warren portfolio

    There is something about alleyways and corners, steps leading somewhere that draws the eye in, wanting to know what is next. That feeling you had of being drawn around corners, this way then that is clear in this drawing, the two people bustling with a sense of purpose, going who knows where, it all tells a story. Once again, the beautiful, soft Venice colours are so much a character of their own in this drawing.

    Reply
    1. juliepodstolski Post author

      It’s so funny, one presumes one is the only lost person in Venice, and that everyone else striding along purposefully know where they are headed. But sometimes you hear snippets of conversation which prove other people are hopelessly lost as well. After a week I got pretty good at directions in some areas but if I went slightly beyond my close-to-the-apartment zones, I was easily disorientated once again.

      Reply
      1. anna warren portfolio

        Getting lost, and finding unexpected corners is part of the pleasure of being somewhere unfamiliar, unless you get really lost! I remember once getting lost in Paris, and ending up in an area where tourists were not welcome – I was with my daughter and we moved as fast as possible to find our way out!

      2. juliepodstolski Post author

        Can you remember which area it was, Anna? I’m intrigued. (Doh – intrigue – there’s that word again)
        ps Matt and I did the same thing in Bilbao, Spain. We felt very uncomfortable in a rather down and out tenement area and hotfooted it out of there.

      3. juliepodstolski Post author

        Absolutely and totally get it! By the way, Matt and I will come to Sydney for a few days in July. Haven’t booked it yet. But let’s catch up. I will write properly soon.

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